Rocky Mountain Fire

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Boulder County Enacts Level 1 Fire Restrictions western Boulder County


Boulder County enacts Level 1 Fire Restrictions

Forecast for hot temperatures and dry conditions has increased fire danger

Boulder County, Colo. - Sheriff Joe Pelle has enacted Level 1 Fire Restrictions, effective immediately, today, Wednesday, August 28, for western Boulder County. The fire restrictions are being implemented due to increasing fire danger, lack of moisture, and the forecast for hot temperatures. The fire restrictions will be in effect until Sheriff Pelle finds that the hazardous conditions have subsided.

The fire restrictions include the mountain areas of Boulder County. The mountain areas include any and all unincorporated areas of the county:

  • West of CO Highway 93 (CO-93), from its intersection with the southern boundary of Boulder County until, and including, its intersection with CO Highway 119 (CO-119);

  • West of Broadway Avenue in the City of Boulder, from its intersection with CO-119 until, and including, its intersection with US Highway 36 (US-36);

  • West of US-36, from its intersection with Broadway Avenue until its intersection with the northern boundary of Boulder County;

  • West of the western boundary of the Rabbit Mountain Open Space until, and including, US-36; and;

  • All of the Rabbit Mountain Open Space property.

A map depicting the areas of Boulder County affected by the fire ban is included below.

The fire ban PROHIBITS:

  1. Building, maintaining, attending, or using an open fire, campfire or stove fire (including charcoal barbecues and grills) on public land;

  2. Use of all personal fireworks;

  3. Shooting or discharging firearms for recreational purposes, except for hunting with a valid and current hunting license on public land;

  4. Smoking, except in an enclosed vehicle or building, a developed recreation site, or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials;

  5. Operating a chainsaw without a USDA or SAE-approved spark arrester properly installed and in effective working order. A chemical, pressurized fire-extinguisher must be kept with the operator, and at least one round-point shovel with an overall length of at least 35 inches must be readily available for use;

  6. Welding or operating an acetylene or other open-flame torch, except in cleared areas of at least 10 feet in diameter, and with a chemical, pressurized fire-extinguisher immediately available for use; and

  7. Using an explosive.

The fire ban ALLOWS:

  1. Building, maintain, attending or using a fire in constructed, permanent fire pits or fire grates, within developed recreation sites (see below), and on private lands;

  2. The use of portable stoves; lanterns using gas, jellied petroleum, or pressurized liquid fuel; or a fully enclosed (sheepherder-type) stove with a 1/4" spark arrester-type screen.

The following United States Forest Service (USFS) developed recreation sites are located within Boulder County and are exempted from the fire restrictions, in accordance with USFS policies and closures, when open and staffed: Kelly Dahl Campground, Rainbow Lakes Campground, Camp Dick Campground, Peacefully Valley Campground, Meeker Park Overflow Campground, Olive Ridge Campground, and the Brainard Lake Recreation Area, which includes the Pawnee Campground.

For current fire, shooting and developed recreation site restrictions and seasonal closures for USFS properties, visit: www.fs.usda.gov/detail/arp/alerts-notices/?cid=fseprd533597.

Anyone found in violation of the fire ban may be convicted of a class two petty offense, and may be subject to up to a $1,000 fine, in addition to any possible civil penalties. Higher fines may be imposed for subsequent offenses.

These fire restrictions are for unincorporated Boulder County. If you live within, or are visiting an incorporated city or town, please check with that city or town directly to see what, if any, fire restrictions they may have in place.

Colorado state statutes authorize counties to impose fire restrictions "to a degree and in a manner that the Board of County Commissioners deems necessary to reduce the danger of wildfires within those portions of the unincorporated areas of the county where the danger of forest or grass fires is found to be high based on competent evidence."

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Thin Ice and Hydrant Snow Removal

Annual Ice Rescue Training

Annual Ice Rescue Training

The warming trends of late winter make the ice particularly weak this time of year.  The only safe ice is at an ice rink, please skate there. Last month the news posted several stories about dog rescues off icy ponds and lakes.  STAY OFF THE ICE! Keep your pets on leash and if they do manage to slip their lead and chase after wildlife onto the ice and fall in, don’t go after them.  Call 911, we will come fully suited up and go out to rescue your pet.  If you go out on the ice and fall through as well, you will be rescued before your pet, putting your pet’s life in further danger.  If you have children; please remind them to stay off the ice.  Your warning may save their life.  

Winter’s not over yet.  Despite some warm windy days, Colorado is entering its snowiest months of the year. If you have a hydrant in your front yard; please don’t bury it. Shovel the snow away from the base, brush off the top and ensure we can see it from the street.  If you can keep your sidewalks and driveway, clear of snow and ice we are able to access you quicker during an emergency; not to mention it is safer for your family and guests to enter and exit your home.  In the final months of winter take the time to help us help you. 

www.rockyfire.org#WinterSafetywww.ready.gov.pets

Space Heaters and Carbon Monoxide Detectors

In with the new and out with the old.  Starting with your dry and dead Christmas tree.  Please use proper sources for Christmas tree recycling and don’t leave it sitting beside your home. 

If temperatures take a nose dive, be certain to leave your thermostat above 50 degrees and do not use your oven to heat your home.  If you are adding heat with a space heater, keep it a minimum of 36 inches from combustibles and don’t leave it on overnight or when you leave the house.  Do not use extension cords to extend the reach of your space heater. Heaters draw many amps and can easily exceed the rating of residential extension cords and cause an electrical fire. 

With the furnace working overtime in the months of January and February it’s a great time to be certain you have working Carbon monoxide detectors.

For more information or assistance please contact Rocky Mountain Fire @RockyMtnFire or www.rockyfire.org.  

Happy New Year!

Why should you change your detector batteries?

Avoid the chirp and change the batteries in your smoke detectors November 4th when clocks fall back an hour. Smoke detectors have a back up battery for those times when the power goes out and those batteries can wear out. Even if you have a 10 year battery in your smoke detector, your detectors have a 10 year life span and then the detectors need to be replaced. Failing batteries and old detectors are the most common reason for chirping smoke detectors. Other preventative measures for avoiding the chirp include vacuuming cobwebs and dust from your smoke detectors and performing a monthly test. To test detectors monthly, push the test button and it should alarm. Unless your smoke detectors are tied to a security or monitored fire alarm system this monthly test will not alert the fire department. If your smoke detectors alert and you don’t know why, go outside and call 911; Rocky Mountain Fire will be happy to come check things out.

November 4th is also a great time to check the batteries in your carbon monoxide detectors as well. Lots of smoke detectors have CO detectors in the same device but CO detectors are also sold as separate devices. If you have gas appliances in your home (fireplaces, stoves, furnaces and water heaters) you need a carbon monoxide detector on every level of your home. Carbon monoxide is a colorless and odorless gas. It can cause headaches, nausea, sleepiness and even death. Our homes are closed up in cold weather to conserve heat and energy. If you have a malfunctioning gas appliance this is a recipe for disaster. If your detector alerts or you suspect you have a leak, leave your home and call 911. Rocky Mountain Fire will come and use our detectors to check for elevated carbon monoxide levels in your home.

You earned an hour of extra sleep on November 4th, give an extra 10 minutes to possibly save your life and change your smoke detector batteries and test both the smoke and CO detectors in your home.

If you have a question about smoke or carbon monoxide detectors ask us at www.rockfire.org or NFPA Smoke Detectors And NFPA Carbon Monoxide Detectors

For more information or assistance please contact Rocky Mountain Fire @RockyMtnFire or www.rockyfire.org.  

Happy New Year!

Fire Prevention Week and Rocky Mountain Fire Open House, this Sunday, Oct 7 from 1-3pm.

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Look. Listen. Learn. It can happen anywhere. National Fire Prevention Week 2018 is October 7 through October 13.  Rocky Mountain Fire would like to invite you to come visit us and “Look” at the trucks, allow us to “Listen” to your questions and concerns, and “Learn” about fire safety in your home, office, and community. We are hosting an Open House on Sunday October 7th from 1pm-3pm at Station 5, 2701 S Indiana Street in Superior.  If you have children still in car seats, we will have car seat technicians on hand to verify your seat installation and answer all your car seat questions; no appointment needed. Kids will be learning about fire safety in school this month.  Kindergartners see firefighters dressed up, learn what number to call for emergencies and practice stop, drop and roll if their clothes catch fire.  1st graders learn fire safety lessons from the book No Tea for Dragons and our special smoke breathing puppet friend. 2nd graders learn how to call 911 in case of emergency on a phone simulator and 3rd graders either refresh their phone calling skills or learn about the fire department as part of their community.  4th graders create maps of their home and practice escape plans for the family in case of fire.  Our smart 5th graders learn how to use a home fire extinguisher. Do you know how to use one?  If you don’t come visit Rocky Mountain Fire Station 5, 2701 S Indiana Street on October 7th from 1pm-3pm and learn how!

New Ambulance Billing Process - No Fees To District Residents

Rocky Mountain Fire Protection District is pleased to announce that we are changing our ambulance billing process. If you are a resident that lives within our district and you are in need of our ambulance service, you will not receive a bill for anything over what insurance covers. This means that, if you call 911, we will bill your insurance and any amount not covered will not be billed to you. Rocky Mountain Fire values the relationships with its constituents and sees ambulance service as included in the taxes you pay.

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Fire restrictions lowered to Stage 1

On July 25, 2018, at 12:00 p.m., Sheriff Pelle lowered the fire restrictions that were in place for western Boulder County from Level 2 to Level 1. While we received some rainfall in Boulder County, and the moisture did help lower the fire danger, it was not enough to completely remove the fire danger, which is why we will continue to have fire restrictions in place.

The fire restrictions do not affect open fires within incorporated cities and towns; however, residents and visitors must comply with applicable ordinances and regulations in their respective cities and towns.

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Western Boulder County Stage 2 Fire Restrictions

Boulder County enacting Level 2 Fire Restrictions

Forecast for hot temperatures and dry conditions has increased fire danger

Boulder County, Colo. - Sheriff Joe Pelle will be enacting Level 2 Fire Restrictions, effective immediately, today, Tuesday, July 10, for western Boulder County. The fire restrictions are being implemented due to increasing fire danger, lack of moisture and the forecast for hot temperatures. We also have seen an increase in recreational activities in western Boulder County during the summer months. In addition, local and regional fire suppression resources have also been committed to large fires in Colorado and across the nation.

The fire restrictions include the mountain areas of Boulder County. The mountain areas include any and all unincorporated areas of the county:

  • West of CO Highway 93 (CO-93), from its intersection with the southern boundary of Boulder County until, and including, its intersection with CO Highway 119 (CO-119);
  • West of Broadway Avenue in the City of Boulder, from its intersection with CO-119 until, and including, its intersection with US Highway 36 (US-36);
  • West of US-36, from its intersection with Broadway Avenue until its intersection with the northern boundary of Boulder County;
  • West of the western boundary of the Rabbit Mountain Open Space until, and including, US-36; and;
  • All of the Rabbit Mountain Open Space property.

A map depicting the areas of Boulder County affected by the fire ban is included below.

The fire ban PROHIBITS:

  • Building, maintaining, attending or using a fire, campfire, or stove fire on private and public lands. This includes charcoal grills and barbecues, coal and wood burning stoves and sheepherder’s stoves and includes use in developed camping and picnic grounds.
  • Fireworks sales, use, and possession, including permissible fireworks.
  • Shooting or discharge of firearms for recreational purposes.
  • Smoking, except in an enclosed vehicle or building, a developed recreation site, or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials.
  • Operating a chainsaw without a USDA or SAE approved spark arrester properly installed and in effective working order, a chemical pressurized fire extinguisher kept with the operator and one round point shovel with an overall length of at least 35 inches readily available for use.
  • Using an explosive. This includes but is not limited to fuses or blasting caps, fireworks, rockets, exploding targets, and tracers or incendiary ammunition.
  • Welding or operating acetylene or other torch with open flame outdoors.
  • Possessing or using a motor vehicle off established roads, motorized trails or established parking areas, except when parking in an area devoid of vegetation within 10 feet of the vehicle.

The fire ban ALLOWS:

  • Smoking in an enclosed vehicle or building, a developed recreation site, or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials.
  • Devices using pressurized liquid or gas (stoves, grills or lanterns) that include shut-off valves are permitted when used in an area at least three feet or more from flammable material such as grasses or pine needles.
  • Shooting or discharge of firearms for hunting, with a valid and current hunting license on public lands.
  • Operating a chainsaw with a USDA or SAE approved spark arrester properly installed and in effective working order, a chemical pressurized fire extinguisher kept with the operator and one round point shovel with an overall length of at least 35 inches readily available for use.

For current fire, shooting and developed recreation site restrictions and seasonal closures for USFS properties, visit: www.fs.usda.gov/detail/arp/alerts-notices/?cid=fseprd533597#boulder.

Anyone found in violation of the fire ban may be convicted of a class two petty offense, and may be subject to up to a $1,000 fine, in addition to any possible civil penalties. Higher fines may be imposed for subsequent offenses.

The fire restrictions do not affect open fires within incorporated cities and towns; however, residents and visitors must comply with applicable ordinances and regulations in their respective cities and towns. The fire restrictions will be in effect until Sheriff Pelle finds that the hazardous conditions have subsided.

Colorado state statutes authorize counties to impose fire restrictions "to a degree and in a manner that the Board of County Commissioners deems necessary to reduce the danger of wildfires within those portions of the unincorporated areas of the county where the danger of forest or grass fires is found to be high based on competent evidence."

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Fire Danger and 4th of July activities.

Fire Danger across the State of Colorado is increasing.  As you head out to go camping, hiking or even for a Sunday drive you need to be in the “know” about the restrictions wherever you go.

The State of Colorado has created a list with links to every County, the Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management and other public lands in Colorado for your use prior to traveling and recreating in the great outdoors. https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/dfpc/fire-bans-and-restrictions.  Please follow the restrictions in place at your destination, the fire danger this year is very real and we would like everyone’s community to stay safe including our own.  Please don’t spread sparks or light fires where they are restricted.  If you must have a fire be sure to FULLY extinguish it before leaving it unattended for any reason by following Smoky Bear’s guidelines. Smoky Bear's guide to campfires

This 4th of July the Town of Superior is again hosting a great family event starting with a fun run and parade.  After you’ve worked up an appetite come eat pancakes at community park and share in the fun with your community.  Please go see a public fireworks display and leave the show to the professionals it will eliminate the danger fireworks can present to you, your neighbors and pets.

Have a happy and safe 4th of July.

@RockyMtnFire

Red Flag Warning in Effect NO OPEN BURNING Boulder County-Wide

RED FLAG WARNING IN EFFECT FROM 11 AM THIS MORNING TO MIDNIGHT MDT TONIGHT FOR WIND AND LOW RELATIVE HUMIDITY FOR THE CENTRAL COLORADO MOUNTAINS AND SOUTHERN FRONT RANGE FOOTHILLS

Very hot and very dry conditions today will combine with wind gusts of 25 to 35 mph to produce extreme fire danger across the northern Colorado mountains this afternoon and evening. The fire danger will also be elevated on the plains, but the winds will not be as strong. Conditions will not be as extreme on Friday, but fire danger will still be very high, especially in the mountain valleys.

The National Weather Service in Denver has issued a Red Flag Warning FOR WIND AND LOW RELATIVE HUMIDITY, which is in effect from 11 AM this morning to midnight MDT tonight.

* Timing...11 AM MDT to 9 PM MDT Thursday

* Winds...Southwest 10 to 20 mph with gusts up to 30 mph.

* Relative Humidity...As low as 9 percent.

* Impacts...Rapid fire growth and spread will be possible under these hot, dry and breezy conditions.

Boulder County Enacting Level 1 Fire Restrictions

The fire restrictions include the mountain areas of Boulder County. The mountain areas include any and all unincorporated areas of the county:

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  • West of CO Highway 93 (CO-93), from its intersection with the southern boundary of Boulder County until, and including, its intersection with CO Highway 119 (CO-119);
  • West of Broadway Avenue in the City of Boulder, from its intersection with CO-119 until, and including, its intersection with US Highway 36 (US-36);
  • West of US-36, from its intersection with Broadway Avenue until its intersection with the northern boundary of Boulder County;
  • West of the western boundary of the Rabbit Mountain Open Space until, and including, US-36; and;
  • All of the Rabbit Mountain Open Space property.

The fire ban PROHIBITS:

  1. Building, maintaining, attending, or using an open fire, campfire or stove fire (including charcoal barbecues and grills) on public land;
  2. Use of all personal fireworks;
  3. Shooting or discharging firearms for recreational purposes, except for hunting with a valid and current hunting license on public land;
  4. Smoking, except in an enclosed vehicle or building, a developed recreation site, or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials;
  5. Operating a chainsaw without a USDA or SAE-approved spark arrester properly installed and in effective working order. A chemical, pressurized fire-extinguisher must be kept with the operator, and at least one round-point shovel with an overall length of at least 35 inches must be readily available for use;
  6. Welding or operating an acetylene or other open-flame torch, except in cleared areas of at least 10 feet in diameter, and with a chemical, pressurized fire-extinguisher immediately available for use; and
  7. Using an explosive.

The fire ban ALLOWS:

  1. Building, maintain, attending or using a fire in constructed, permanent fire pits or fire grates, within developed recreation sites (see below), and on private lands;
  2. The use of portable stoves; lanterns using gas, jellied petroleum, or pressurized liquid fuel; or a fully enclosed (sheepherder-type) stove with a 1/4" spark arrester-type screen.

The following United States Forest Service (USFS) developed recreation sites are located within Boulder County and are exempted from the fire restrictions, in accordance with USFS policies and closures, when open and staffed: Kelly Dahl Campground, Rainbow Lakes Campground, Camp Dick Campground, Peacefully Valley Campground, Meeker Park Overflow Campground, Olive Ridge Campground and the Brainard Lake Recreation Area, which includes the Pawnee Campground.

For current fire, shooting and developed recreation site restrictions and seasonal closures for USFS properties, visit: www.fs.usda.gov/detail/arp/alerts-notices/?cid=fseprd533597#boulder.

Anyone found in violation of the fire ban may be convicted of a class two petty offense, and may be subject to up to a $1,000 fine, in addition to any possible civil penalties. Higher fines may be imposed for subsequent offenses.

The fire restrictions do not affect open fires within incorporated cities and towns; however, residents and visitors must comply with applicable ordinances and regulations in their respective cities and towns. The fire restrictions will be in effect until Sheriff Pelle finds that the hazardous conditions have subsided.

Station 4 5748 Flagstaff Rd Open House 6/10/18 1pm-3pm

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Ever wondered what the inside of that fire station on top of Flagstaff Mountain in Boulder looks like?  Here's your chance to come meet the firefighters, check out the trucks, practice using a fire extinguisher and see what you should have inside your car's emergency kit.  Please join the Flagstaff community and Rocky Mountain Fire for a relaxing afternoon at the firehouse.  We'll even have a trained car seat technician on hand to check out your child's car seat.  See you Sunday!